Introduction to Storyboarding

Under Development for Fall Semester 2022

Introduction to Storyboarding

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Outstanding 90-100

  • At least six panels if working alone, ten panels if working with a partner
  • Storyboard depicts a logical, clear sequence
  • Shot type, subject, and angle are listed in each panel

Proficient 80-90

  • At least five panels if working alone, nine panels if working with a partner
  • Storyboard depicts a logical, clear sequence
  • Shot type, subject, and angle are listed in most panels

Basic 70-80

  • At least four panels if working alone, eight panels if working with a partner
  • Storyboard depicts a somewhat clear sequence
  • Shot type, subject, and angle are listed in some panels

Insufficient 60-70

  • Fewer than six panels if working alone, eight panels if working with a partner
  • Sequence is not entirely clear
  • Shot type and subject are not listed

Standards: ISTE 1a, 1b, 1d, 4b, 4c, 4d

To complete this activity, follow the steps below. Click on links for help.

  1. Look at a wide variety of storyboard examples located at https://www.studiobinder.com/blog/storyboard-examples-film/. When you are looking at these examples, you are encouraged to explore all files and views available, but be sure to at least look at the Storyboard view. This file will show you how to get that view. Look for the purple arrow (pop-up).
  2. Download and print this storyboard template.
  3. Download and read this script excerpt in pdf format ("Explore and Read," n.d.). The teacher will give you a short explanation of the scene.
  4. Alone or in pairs, storyboard the script excerpt. Try to included at least 6 shots if working alone, 10 if working with a partner.
  5. Share your storyboard with the class.

Learning objective: Using a short script excerpt, you will be able to storyboard at least ten shots.

Introduction

"A storyboard is a graphic layout that sequences illustrations and images with the purpose of visually telling a story." (Storyboard Examples, n.d.).

As the above definition indicates, a storyboard is a graphic representation of a story. Storyboarding is part of the pre-production stage of movie making, along with scripting, shot lists, and other steps. A storyboard is used to visualize what a scene will look like.

Step One

Look at a wide variety of storyboard examples located at https://www.studiobinder.com/blog/storyboard-examples-film/. When you are looking at these examples, you are encouraged to explore all files and views available, but be sure to at least look at the Storyboard view. This file will show you how to get that view. Look for the purple arrow (pop-up).

Step Two

Find and browse the storyboard templates on Studiobinder.com. If the Studiobinder site is blocked at school, use this link. The easiest templates for you to eventually use will probably be the four or six panel templates in Word of PDF format.

Step Three

Download and read this script excerpt in pdf format ("Explore and Read," n.d.). The teacher will give you a short explanation of the scene.

Read through the excerpt a few times. As you read, try to visualize the scene.

Step Four

Alone or in pairs, storyboard this script. In the actual scene, the teacher counted over 40 shots! Try to storyboard at least 10 different shots. Talk about it with your classmates first. What do you think this scene looks like? When would there be a close-up? Long shot? High angle? Low angle? Remember to include brief notes with each panel! You can always look back at the examples from Step One for help.

You can use any of the storyboard templates you like, and you can complete them either by hand or digitally. If you complete them on paper, you will need to take a picture of your storyboard so you can submit it to Google Classroom.

Step Five

Share your storyboard with the class.

After you are finished

After you finish identifying appropriate shots for the script excerpt, you can watch the actual scene. The teacher will show the scene in class.


Need a challenge?

Try any of the following:

  • Storyboard additional shots. The original sequence for this bit of script includes over 40 shots!
  • Include a variety of shot types, including CU, ELS, MS, Dutch angle, high and low angles, etc.
  • Include a variety of camera movement.
  • Try to storyboard one of your favorite movie sequences from memory. It's OK if it's not perfect.

REFERENCES

Explore and Read the Best Free Movie Scripts Online (n.d.). Studiobinder. Retrieved May 16, 2022 from https://www.studiobinder.com/blog/best-free-movie-scripts-online/.

Storyboard Examples (n.d.). Studiobinder. Retrieved May 16, 2022 from https://www.studiobinder.com/blog/storyboard-examples-film/.




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